NEW GRADUATE PROGRAM: MA in Art History and Curating, accepting applications for Fall 2017

The Department of Fine Arts and Art History is pleased to announce the launch of the MA in Art History and Curating. Applications are currently being accepted for Fall 2017.

You can view the program’s curriculum here: curriculum_ma_arthistorycurating

Visit the department website to learn more about us: https://www.aub.edu.lb/fas/faah/Academics/Pages/ma-art-curating.aspx

To apply, visit: https://graduateadmissions.aub.edu.lb/

AUB Graduate Application Deadlines for Fall 2017-18: Feb. 10, 2017 + Apr. 3, 2017

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Workshop: Art of the Arabic Periodical (Nov 28-29, co-hosted by FAAH/CAH)

Hala Auji, FAAH assistant professor of Islamic art & a faculty fellow at AUB’s Center for the Arts and Humanities (CAH), is organizing a two-day workshop on the Ottoman periodical, “Art of the Arabic Periodical: Exploring Questions of Materiality, Readership & Language in 19th Century Ottoman Journals.” The workshop sessions will be held at AUB in Building 37 (CAH) from Nov 28-29.

See below for more details:

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View workshop program here (PDF): program_arabicperiodicalsworkshop_nov2016

Samo Tomšič (Humboldt University Berlin): “Rethinking Alienation”

Guest Lecture: “Rethinking Alienation” by Samo Tomšič (Humboldt University Berlin),  moderated by Sami Khatib (American University of Beirut)

Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016| 5:30-7pm| Art History Reading Group| West Hall 310| AUB

The Art History Reading Group is delighted to announce the guest lecture of Samo Tomšič, author of “The Capitalist Unconscious (London: Verso, 2015). A major, comprehensive study of the connection between their work, “The Capitalist Unconscious” resituates Marx in the broader context of Lacan’s teaching and insists on the capacity of psychoanalysis to reaffirm dialectical and materialist thought. Lacan’s unorthodox reading of Marx refigured such crucial concepts as alienation, jouissance and the Freudian ‘labour theory of the unconscious’. Tracing these developments, Tomšič maintains that psychoanalysis, structuralism and the critique of political economy participate in the same movement of thought; his book shows how to follow this movement through to some of its most important conclusions.

More on https://www.versobooks.com/books/2014-the-capitalist-unconscious

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Upcoming Lecture: Alexander Keefe (NYU’s Colloquium for Unpopular Culture)

WHEN THE THEATRE WENT EAST: LA MONTE YOUNG, TERRY RILEY AND MARIAN ZAZEELA IN INDIA, 1971

June 28, 20162:00pm | Center for Arts and Humanities, Building 37 | AUB

Alexander Keefe seminar talk at AUB will focus on La Monte Young’s relationship with India, Indian music and especially Pandit Pran Nath, whom the composer accepted as his spiritual and musical guru in 1970. For Young, “guruji” presented a powerful model for emulation: both improviser and composer, singer and yogi, disciple and master. In him, Young heard a sound that stretched back through the ancient Vedas into prehistory and cosomogony. He also heard the future: for himself and his music.

Keefe starts with John Cage’s early engagement with Indian aesthetics and first visit to India in 1964 with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. Cage kept Indian music at a distance, borrowing philosophical ideas from books while avoiding direct contact. La Monte Young, who first visited India with Marian Zazeela and Terry Riley in 1971, could not present a sharper contrast, or one more indicative of the generational chasm separating the two composers. Cage’s India had been one of concert halls, cocktail parties and Corbusiers; Young’s was one of small-town temples, cave-dwelling ascetics, daily practice and spiritual pilgrimage. His formal initiation as disciple carried with it obligations, not only to a living guru, but to a hallowed chain of past masters, as well as to imagined futures — and eternities.

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Tania Mouraud, Initiation Room No. 2, 1971  – From left to right Tania Mouraud, Terry Riley, Ann Riley, Pandit Pran Nath, La Monte Young, Marian Zazeela

Alexander Keefe is a writer living in Los Angeles, California. His work has appeared in BidounEast of Borneo and Artforum, among others. Keefe did graduate work in Sanskrit and Indian studies at Harvard University and later taught as an assistant professor at Ohio University. A 2010 grantee of the Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program, he has also received a Fulbright for research in India and currently holds the Inaugural Alan Erasmus Fellowship in Unpopular Culture at NYU’s Colloquium for Unpopular Culture.

For more information, please contact Angela Harutyunyan at ah140@aub.edu.lb or Sahar Assaf at sa159@aub.edu.lb 

2016 FAS Awards: Natasha Gasparian, Art History 2016

The Department of Fine Arts and Art History congratulates this year’s 2016 Faculty of Arts and Sciences award recipient Natasha Gasparian (Art History, 2016), who received The Majida Siniora Memorial Prize in Humanities, awarded to a senior student with the highest average graduating in Arts and Humanities at the Faculty of Arts & Sciences, and the M & C Saatchi MENA award.

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Natasha Gasparian (second from right) pictured on stage with FAS Dean Patrick McGreevy, May 2016

The department also extends its congratulations to Rima Kaddoura (minor in Studio Art, 2016) for receiving the Philip K. Hitti Prize, awarded to an outstanding student(s) of the Senior class in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences “who, in the judgment of the President of the University, the Dean of the Faculty, and the Chairman of the Department concerned, exemplifies in his/her academic career the scholarly spirit of the University at its best”.

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Rima Kaddoura (second from left) pictured on stage with FAS Dean Patrick McGreevy, May 2016

Last but not least, congratulations to all of this year’s graduates in Studio Art and Art History!

 

CONFERENCE: Do Not Resuscitate

Join us for (last) conference of Spring 2016, in which Angela Harutyunyan, Associate Professor of Art History, is serving as a panel organizer and discussant (with Sami Khatib), and Octavian Esanu, Assistant Professor of Art History, is presenting a paper:

DO NOT RESUSCITATE: CRITIQUE AND THE UNTRANSLATABILITY OF HISTORY

Organized by the Center for Arts and Humanities (Mellon Grant) at AUB
For the full three-day program, which begins on Thursday, May 12 at 2:00 pm, visit: http://www.aub.edu.lb/cah/Pages/conference.aspx

FAAH-related panel + presentations on Thursday, May 12

17:00 | Panel 1 (Angela Harutyunyan and Sami Khatib):
The “Tradition of the Oppressed” and Its Discontents

DiscussantsNadia Bou Ali (AUB), Angela Harutyunyan (AUB), Sami Khatib (AUB)

Panel papers:
1 | Massimiliano Tomba (Padua University): The Task of the Historical Materialist
2 |  Jamila Mascat (University of Paris 1 Sorbonne): In Praise of Anachronism. Untimeliness, Contingency and Strategy
3 | Octavian Esanu (AUB): Neoliberal Aesthetics: Governability, Anesthesia and Contemporary Art

Abstract: Following Walter Benjamin’s concept of history, the past is never simply gone; it can never be historicized unless it is fully actualized, recalled – cited in a revolutionary way. However, the undead specters of an unhistoricizable past can only be passed on from below – transmitted through the “tradition of the oppressed,” a discontinuous tradition bound to a partisan experience of untold sufferings. It is only this anachronic, de-subjectified experience that can connect the present with lost struggles of the past. The tradition of the oppressed is both radically singular and universal, counter-temporal (messianic, revolutionary) and counter-spatial (spectral, u-topian). Drawing on Benjamin, the panel raises the question of an “aesthetics of the oppressed” beyond bourgeois (high culture) forms of representation. What happened when the oppressed, at least for a moment or over a limited period of time, overtook the means of production within the domain of bourgeois high culture? Is there an undead inheritance of these past defeated attempts that could inspire a materialist conception of aesthetics today?

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