UPCOMING CONCERT: April 24-25, Fortunat Frölich’s “About Love | عن الحب”

Join us for a free performance of Fortunat Frölich’s “About Love عن الحب” conducted by Thomas Kim (Chairperson and Assistant Professor of Music, FAAH) and Fortunat Frölich (choR inteR kultuR), and sung by Rima Kcheich (Instructor of Music, FAAH). The performances will take place on April 24 + 25, at 7:30 pm, in the AUB Assembly Hall.

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Jabre Lecture Series: Nancy Um, April 5

Join us on Wednesday, April 5 at 6:00 pm in Auditorium A, West Hall for a public lecture entitled “The Trouble with Mobility: The Complex History of the So-Called Indian Wedding Chair” by Nancy Um, Associate Professor of Islamic art at Binghamton University, which is part of the AUB Art Galleries and the Department of Fine Arts and Art History’s  Jabre Lecture Series in Art History and Curating .

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Jabre Lecture Series: Amanda Beech, March 30

Join us on Thursday, March 30 at 6:00 pm in College Hall, B1 for a public lecture entitled “Decisive Constructions: Art After the Crises of the Image” by Amanda Beech, Dean of Critical Studies at CalArts, which is part of the AUB Art Galleries and the Department of Fine Arts and Art History’s  Jabre Lecture Series in Art History and Curating .

Amanda Beech will be visiting AUB from March 25th-April 7th, 2017, as a URB Visiting Scholar, co-hosted by the Department of Fine Arts and Art History and the Department of Philosophy. 

See the PDF flyer for more details about the Jabre lecture: Beech Poster

Also join us on Friday, March 31 at 5:00-7:00 pm in College Hall, Auditorium B1 for a public screening of Beech’s video works Final Machine, 2013 and Sanity Assassin, 2010, which will be followed by a conversation with Ray Brassier (AUB, Philosophy) and Angela Harutyunyan (AUB, FAAH). Visit the following for more information about this event: https://www.facebook.com/events/680007578872779/

 

Two upcoming Islamic Print Culture Events: Feb 21 + Feb 22

Please join us for two upcoming CAH/FAAH events that deal with Arabic print culture:

Tuesday, Feb 21: Book Discussion: Print Cultures in the 19th Century Islamic World

Time + Location: 5:00-6:30 PM, Building 37 (Center for the Arts + Humanities, AUB)

Discussants: Jan van der Putten (University of Hamburg) + Hala Auji (AUB)

Moderator: Bilal Orfali (AUB)

This event will be a public discussion of Hala Auji’s recent monograph on 19th century Arabic book culture, Printing Arab Modernity: Book Culture and the American Press in 19th Century Beirut (Brill: 2016), which is located in the interstices of art history, book and print culture, and studies of Arab modernity and Ottoman historiographies. Printing Arab Modernity examines the American Protestant mission’s Arabic publications printed in Beirut for Ottoman readers during a period dominated by Islamic and Christian manuscript practices. This book also explores the growing significance of the visual dimensions of print for such audiences, specifically how print reflected a push-pull dynamic between the continuity of scribal customs and an experimentation with new technologies. This was indicative of a moment when local intellectuals were formulating a visual language that negotiated their varied communal concerns, political motivations, and intellectual conceptions of a modern society.

Although the subject of this book centers on the Arab Nahda period in Ottoman Beirut, the book discussion considers a wider, globally comparative perspective by exploring print-related developments during this period in the Global South, specifically Southeast Asia. The conversation between Dr. Jan van der Putten and Auji will provide a new perspective from which we can consider the history of book culture during transitional periods such as the 19th century, and to explore how notions of modernity varied or overlapped in different regions, which also saw encounters between Islamic communities and Christian missionary groups.

https://www.facebook.com/events/694961847341501/

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Wednesday, Feb 22: Manuscript Cultures and the Start of an Indigenous Printing Industry in Maritime Southeast Asia

Time + Location: 6:00-7:30 PM, Building 37 (Center for the Arts + Humanities, AUB)

Speaker: Dr. Jan van der Putten (University of Hamburg)

The development of manuscript cultures in insular Southeast Asia may be viewed as the vernacularisation of Indian and Arabic traditions. These traditions brought the scripts which over time developed into localised scripts, and prompted the creation of written traditions and book culture in a region that continued to be predominantly oral in its orientation. The region is vast and characterised by an enormous linguistic and cultural diversity of communities which in the premodern era were connected through religious and mercantile networks.

In this talk I will concisely introduce some of the most conspicuous manuscript traditions of the region and try to sketch the position of an indigenous book production starting in the second half of the 19th century. This budding printing industry developed in the shadow of the British and Dutch colonial authorities and was propelled by the relations Muslim communities maintained with the Middle East.

About the Speaker:
Jan van der Putten is Professor Austronesistik in the Department of Southeast Asia (Asien-Afrika-Institut) at the University of Hamburg where he teaches on Southeast Asian literatures and cultures. Traditional Malay writing is one of his main research areas and he is a member of the Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures at the University of Hamburg supervising a research project about the Changing Practices of the 19th-century Malay Manuscript Economy. He also ventures into other types and periods of Malay-language cultural traditions where he explores the meaning of traditional and popular Malay texts and how these texts are disseminated among peoples and exchanged between cultures. 

Recent publications include ‘Dirty Dancing’ and Malay anxieties: the changing context of Malay Ronggeng in the first half of the twentieth century’, ‘Going Against the Tide: The Politics of language Standardisation in Indonesia’, ‘Malaiische Erotika: Biedere Sexualethik in obszönen Versen’, and Translation in Asia. Theories, Practices, Histories (co-edited with Ronit Ricci, 2011).

http://www.facebook.com/events/316230898772084/

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Events Organized by:
Hala Auji, 2016-17 CAH Faculty Fellow & Assistant Professor of Islamic Art, Fine Arts and Art History, AUB, ha156@aub.edu.lb

NEW GRADUATE PROGRAM: MA in Art History and Curating, accepting applications for Fall 2017

The Department of Fine Arts and Art History is pleased to announce the launch of the MA in Art History and Curating. Applications are currently being accepted for Fall 2017.

You can view the program’s curriculum here: curriculum_ma_arthistorycurating

Visit the department website to learn more about us: https://www.aub.edu.lb/fas/faah/Academics/Pages/ma-art-curating.aspx

To apply, visit: https://graduateadmissions.aub.edu.lb/

AUB Graduate Application Deadlines for Fall 2017-18: Feb. 10, 2017 + Apr. 3, 2017

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Workshop: Art of the Arabic Periodical (Nov 28-29, co-hosted by FAAH/CAH)

Hala Auji, FAAH assistant professor of Islamic art & a faculty fellow at AUB’s Center for the Arts and Humanities (CAH), is organizing a two-day workshop on the Ottoman periodical, “Art of the Arabic Periodical: Exploring Questions of Materiality, Readership & Language in 19th Century Ottoman Journals.” The workshop sessions will be held at AUB in Building 37 (CAH) from Nov 28-29.

See below for more details:

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View workshop program here (PDF): program_arabicperiodicalsworkshop_nov2016

2016 FAS Awards: Natasha Gasparian, Art History 2016

The Department of Fine Arts and Art History congratulates this year’s 2016 Faculty of Arts and Sciences award recipient Natasha Gasparian (Art History, 2016), who received The Majida Siniora Memorial Prize in Humanities, awarded to a senior student with the highest average graduating in Arts and Humanities at the Faculty of Arts & Sciences, and the M & C Saatchi MENA award.

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Natasha Gasparian (second from right) pictured on stage with FAS Dean Patrick McGreevy, May 2016

The department also extends its congratulations to Rima Kaddoura (minor in Studio Art, 2016) for receiving the Philip K. Hitti Prize, awarded to an outstanding student(s) of the Senior class in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences “who, in the judgment of the President of the University, the Dean of the Faculty, and the Chairman of the Department concerned, exemplifies in his/her academic career the scholarly spirit of the University at its best”.

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Rima Kaddoura (second from left) pictured on stage with FAS Dean Patrick McGreevy, May 2016

Last but not least, congratulations to all of this year’s graduates in Studio Art and Art History!

 

CONFERENCE: Do Not Resuscitate

Join us for (last) conference of Spring 2016, in which Angela Harutyunyan, Associate Professor of Art History, is serving as a panel organizer and discussant (with Sami Khatib), and Octavian Esanu, Assistant Professor of Art History, is presenting a paper:

DO NOT RESUSCITATE: CRITIQUE AND THE UNTRANSLATABILITY OF HISTORY

Organized by the Center for Arts and Humanities (Mellon Grant) at AUB
For the full three-day program, which begins on Thursday, May 12 at 2:00 pm, visit: http://www.aub.edu.lb/cah/Pages/conference.aspx

FAAH-related panel + presentations on Thursday, May 12

17:00 | Panel 1 (Angela Harutyunyan and Sami Khatib):
The “Tradition of the Oppressed” and Its Discontents

DiscussantsNadia Bou Ali (AUB), Angela Harutyunyan (AUB), Sami Khatib (AUB)

Panel papers:
1 | Massimiliano Tomba (Padua University): The Task of the Historical Materialist
2 |  Jamila Mascat (University of Paris 1 Sorbonne): In Praise of Anachronism. Untimeliness, Contingency and Strategy
3 | Octavian Esanu (AUB): Neoliberal Aesthetics: Governability, Anesthesia and Contemporary Art

Abstract: Following Walter Benjamin’s concept of history, the past is never simply gone; it can never be historicized unless it is fully actualized, recalled – cited in a revolutionary way. However, the undead specters of an unhistoricizable past can only be passed on from below – transmitted through the “tradition of the oppressed,” a discontinuous tradition bound to a partisan experience of untold sufferings. It is only this anachronic, de-subjectified experience that can connect the present with lost struggles of the past. The tradition of the oppressed is both radically singular and universal, counter-temporal (messianic, revolutionary) and counter-spatial (spectral, u-topian). Drawing on Benjamin, the panel raises the question of an “aesthetics of the oppressed” beyond bourgeois (high culture) forms of representation. What happened when the oppressed, at least for a moment or over a limited period of time, overtook the means of production within the domain of bourgeois high culture? Is there an undead inheritance of these past defeated attempts that could inspire a materialist conception of aesthetics today?

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CONFERENCE: Books in Motion, May 5-7, 2016

“Books in Motion: Exploring Concepts of Mobility in Cross-Cultural Studies of the Book” is a three day conference that explores new perspectives in the study of the book. The conference considers the varied inter-disciplinary approaches to studies of mobility in relation to books, specifically the ways in which these objects traverse spatial, temporal, cultural, and material boundaries. The conference brings together international and regional scholars from the interconnected fields of book history, art history, literary studies, digital humanities, and cultural studies whose research explores the material dimensions, circulation, and collection of books in Middle Eastern/Islamic, African, and Asian contexts. THE CONFERENCE INCLUDES:

  • TWO KEYNOTE LECTURES:
  • FIVE PANELS devoted to knowledge production, travel and exchange, material transformations, aesthetics and politics, and digital remediation.
  • ROUNDTABLE on contemporary art and book culture.
  • POSTER PRESENTATION by students from AUB’s English literature program.
  • BOOK EXHIBITION held at AUB’s Jafet library, curated by Hala Auji (FAAH, AUB) and Sonja Mejcher-Atassi (English, AUB), which features manuscripts, printed books, digital projects, and examples of book art related to the conference themes.

“Books in Motion” is organized by the Department of English and the Department of Fine Arts and Art History at the American University of Beirut.

For details about times, venues, panels and speakers, please visit: http://www.aub.edu.lb/fas/english/Documents/BOOKSinMOTION.pdf

Screen Shot 2016-04-21 at 2.56.43 PMThis event is FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

It is supported by AUB’s Center for Arab and Middle Eastern Studies (CAMES), the Center for Arts and Humanities (CAH), and the Archives and Special Collections Department (ASC), University Libraries, and produced in collaboration with the Orient-Institut Beirut (OIB), Max Weber Foundation.Funding was generously provided by AUB’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ Office of the Dean, CAMES, & CAH, as well as the OIB.

The conference is part of the series of events commemorating the 150th anniversary of AUB.

For more information contact conference organizers: Sonja Mejcher-Atassism78@aub.edu.lb, Hala Auji, ha156@aub.edu.lb,  and James Hodappjh53@aub.edu.lb.

UPCOMING LECTURE: Vardan Azatyan (Yerevan State Academy of Fine Arts)

Vardan Azatyan, Associate Professor in art history at Yerevan State Academy of Fine Arts (Armenia), will be delivering a public lecture entitled:

Art History, the Ape of the Cold War: the Case of H. W. Janson

Tues, May 3, 2016 | 5-6:30 pm | Center for Arts and Humanities, Building 37 | AUB

By drawing on the work of Erwin Panofsky’s student, a Renaissance scholar and a Modernist critic Horst Woldemar Janson, I argue that the notion of the human that underlined “the history of art as a humanistic discipline” was marked by the antithesis between animality and divinity. To hold on to this notion of the human, humanistic art history imposed on itself an a priori ethical conviction of human dignity and granted the apolitical scholarship a political dimension, politics here perceived in moral-psychological terms. I discuss Janson’s art history against the backdrop of the rise of totalitarian regimes of the 1930s and the subsequent Cold War. To understand the mediated relationship between the humanistic art history and the Cold War in its specificity, I focus on one of the figures of this uneasy mediation, the ape. During the Second World War the ape stood for the infrahuman animality that signified totalitarian anxieties Janson aimed to neutralize by locating this figure in an uninterrupted historical narrative. The ape appeared as an embodiment of the main aesthetic dilemma of the Cold War, that of mimesis. In this context, Janson entered the controversy over abstraction with a defense of Abstract Expressionism, which he anchored in the tradition of Renaissance humanism. Janson’s influential History of Art was shaped during this process and represented the full realization of the project of legitimating Abstract Expressionism as a successor of the ideals of Classical Humanism in art.

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Vardan Azatyan is an art historian and translator. He is Associate Professor in art history at Yerevan State Academy of Fine Arts, Armenia. As a Visiting Professor he has lectured at Columbia University, and the Dutch Art Institute, Enschede, NL. He is the cofounder of AICA – Armenia. His recent publications include articles in ARTMargins, Oxford Art Journal, Human Affairs, and Springerin. He is the co-editor, with Malcolm Miles, of the volume Cultural Memory (University of Plymouth Press, 2010). His book Art History and Nationalism: Medieval Arts of Armenia and Georgia in 19th century Germany was published in 2012 in Armenian language. He is the translator of major works by George Berkeley and David Hume into Armenian. Azatyan is the President of The Johannissyan Research Institute in the Humanities in Yerevan.

For more information, please contact Angela Harutyunyan at ah140@aub.edu.lb